A Big Indian Story

26 June, 2015- 2nd July, 2015

View what happened in the exhibition on these six days here.

For over the period of six days, Gyaan Adab Centre came alive with the whispers of various traditions of our country. Be it a mirror stylized and framed around expert handicraft or a simple white table that looked more elegant than fashionable, A Big Indian Story took those present into a journey that crossed borders, into the heart of India.

The exhibit featured three beautiful traditional art forms - Kalamkari from Andhra Pradesh, Gond from Madhya Pradesh and the Bengal Pattachitra. It was fascinating to realize that each state had their own story, their own people who had their own setbacks and opportunities.  It was amazing to see the talent that lied in the hands of these folk artisans who were so untouched by civilization yet can touch you through the thoughts behind their paintings, sculpture and craft.

However, what we don't realize these days is that many of these art forms are shrinking. Which causes these gifted artists to face economic hardships, chiefly due to lack of support. And to see an exhibition that was working towards revival of these art forms by taking their art to a wider audience and ensuring recognition and respectful livelihood for these artisans, is something one doesn't come across often. For one can always be assured that these artisans will carry on their work relentlessly, ensuring that their future generations carry on their lineage.

The tribes of India and their traditional arts and crafts are beautifully brought out in this assortment.

The tribes of India and their traditional arts and crafts are beautifully brought out in this assortment.

Many of these art forms are shrinking and these gifted artist are facing economic hardships due to lack of support and patronage!

Many of these art forms are shrinking and these gifted artist are facing economic hardships due to lack of support and patronage!

A Big Indian Story, as part of their mission, is working towards revival of these art forms by taking their art to a wider audience and ensuring recognition and respectful livelihood for these artisans.

A Big Indian Story, as part of their mission, is working towards revival of these art forms by taking their art to a wider audience and ensuring recognition and respectful livelihood for these artisans.

Mr. Azeem Merchant inaugurates the exhibition.

Mr. Azeem Merchant inaugurates the exhibition.

The artists use natural colors derived from charcoal, colored soil, plant sap, leaves, and cow dung. This mystical art form is created by putting together dots and lines.

The artists use natural colors derived from charcoal, colored soil, plant sap, leaves, and cow dung. This mystical art form is created by putting together dots and lines.

Patachitra or scroll painting of rural Bengal are made by the Patuas, a branch of the Chitrakar caste. The Patuas are professional artists who make images and paintings for a living. They are also accomplished singers.

Patachitra or scroll painting of rural Bengal are made by the Patuas, a branch of the Chitrakar caste. The Patuas are professional artists who make images and paintings for a living. They are also accomplished singers.